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pringles inventor is a true american hero June 2, 2008

Posted by patrick.klepek in Uncategorized.
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CINCINNATI, Ohio (AP) — The man who designed the Pringles potato chip packaging system was so proud of his accomplishment that a portion of his ashes has been buried in one of the iconic cans.

The man who designed the Pringles can had part of his cremated remains buried in one, his family says. Fredric J. Baur, of Cincinnati, died May 4 at Vitas Hospice in Cincinnati, his family said. He was 89.

Baur’s children said they honored his request to bury him in one of the cans by placing part of his cremated remains in a Pringles container in his grave in suburban Springfield Township.

The rest of his remains were placed in an urn buried along with the can, with some placed in another urn and given to a grandson, said Baur’s daughter, Linda Baur of Diamondhead, Mississippi. Baur requested the burial arrangement because he was proud of his design of the Pringles container, a son, Lawrence Baur of Stevensville, Michigan, said Monday.

Baur was an organic chemist and food storage technician who specialized in research and development and quality control for Cincinnati-based Procter & Gamble Co. Baur filed for a patent for the tubular Pringles container and for the method of packaging the curved, stacked chips in the container in 1966, and it was granted in 1970, P&G archivist Ed Rider said.

Baur retired from P&G in the early 1980s.

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1. John O'Neill - April 5, 2009

I think that anyone checking the archives would find that there were several “inventors” of Pringles & the can. My father, David C. O’Neill, an engineer in product development at Winton Hill Technical Center in the 1960s, had a large part in this gentleman’s “invention”. Fred may have been a team leader of soem type, but can not be credited with “inventing” Pringles.

The idea came from the Tinker Toy cans in use at the time and there was a plastic flange that would cover the sharp edge left from opening the can, an invention of my father’s due to his like of canned peanuts and the resulting cuts he suffered fromn the sharp edge of those cans.


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